Liquor licences in NZ

To sell alcohol in New Zealand in any form you will need to get a Liquor licence. The lawyers at Queen City Law are experienced in dealing with submissions to get a Liquor licences.

We have compiled a series of blog posts which illustrate the laws and processes you will need to navigate to get a Liquor licence

What is a liquor licence?

  • Sale of alcohol to the public requires the seller to have a liquor licence. There are four types of licence: On-licence (eg, pub, restaurant, cafe, bar) Off-licence (eg, bottle store, supermarket) Club licence (eg, sports club, RSA, working men’s club) Special licence (eg, for a food and wine festival, wedding in a council hall etc.). An on-licence, off-licence, or club licence is granted initially for one year and then can be renewed every three years. Special licences are granted per event or for a series of events.

Sale of alcohol to the public requires the seller to have a liquor licence. There are four types of licence:

  • On-licence (eg, pub, restaurant, cafe, bar) – Off-licence (eg, bottle store, supermarket) – Club licence (eg, sports club, RSA, working men’s club)Special licence (eg, for a food and wine festival, wedding in a council hall etc.). An on-licence, off-licence, or club licence is granted initially for one year and then can be renewed every three years. Special licences are granted per event or for a series of events.

What does a liquor licence allow?

It allows the licensee to sell alcohol according to the conditions of the licence.Conditions cover such things as:who alcohol can be sold to the hours and days alcohol can be sold who is allowed on the premises the range of food, non-alcohol and low-alcohol drinks to be provided provision of information about alternative transport arrangements.
  • How much is too much?

    Try out this guide to standard drinks.

It is against the law for a licensee or their staff to sell alcohol to anyone who is intoxicated, to allow a person to become intoxicated, or serve alcohol to anyone under the age of 18 years. There are heavy penalties for these offences.

If you drink a 330ml can of beer or a 100ml glass of table wine or a 30ml glass of straight spirits, you are drinking approximately 10 grams of alcohol, depending on the alcohol percentage. 10 grams of alcohol equals one standard drink.

To drink responsibly, you need to know just how much alcohol is in a drink.

– See more at the New Zealand Alcohol Organisation 

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